Broll_stills-16.jpg

Lessons Learned

Statistics

Nearly 40 percent of children in the United States live in low-income families  families with incomes at or below 200 percent of the federal poverty level (FPL).[1] Youth from low-income families are vulnerable to poor outcomes as adults, as these youth often lack the resources and opportunities found to lead to better outcomes. This fact sheet compares the young adult outcomes and adolescent risk-taking behaviors of youth from low-income families to those from middle-income (201-400 percent of FPL) and high-income (401 percent of FPL or higher) families.

  • Nearly a third of youth from low-income families (29 percent) fail to earn high school diplomas, approximately three times greater than the percentage of youth from middle-income families (10 percent) and roughly six times greater than the percentage of youth from high-income families (5 percent).[3]

  • Only one in ten youth from low-income families (10 percent) go on to graduate from a four-year college, compared with over a quarter (28 percent) of youth from middle-income families and half (50 percent) of youth from high-income families.

  • One in five youth from low-income families (20 percent) are charged with an adult crime by the age of 24, which is higher than the number of youth from middle- and high-income families (16 and 12 percent, respectively).

  • Less than half of youth from low-income families (44 percent) remain consistently-connected to school and/or the labor market between ages 18 and 24, a lower share than among youth from middle- and high-income families (67 and 75 percent, respectively) (see Figure 1).[4]

  • Roughly 1 in 5 youth from low-income families (18 percent) never connect (making extremely short, or no connections to school and/or the labor market between ages 18 and 24), while only 1 in 50 youth from high-income families (2 percent) fall into this category.

 
 
Youth Connected to Education.JPG
 

Statistics from Vulnerable Youth and the Transition to Adulthood report, ASPE fact sheet:
http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/09/vulnerableyouth/3/index.shtml

Additional Information & Resources 

  • National Center For Children In Poverty Website:

Basic Facts About Low Income Children – http://www.nccp.org/publications/pub_1100.html

 
 
 

Impact

Now is the time to invest in our youth, to light the path of hope for them and s show them that indeed their dreams are possible and great opportunities await for them outside of their neighborhood or circumstance. With your help, we can leave an indelible mark on our youth, many of who have traversed much hardship in their lives, and further cement in them the belief that they can rise above their circumstances and see that many do care for them and are cheering them on to succeed.

Since 2015,

  • Over 300 Youth impacted. Rose 2 Hope has worked with, supported or mentored youth in Northern NJ/NYC Area, Providence (RI), Denver (CO) and New Orleans (LA, in partnership with a local community organization)

  • Over $20,000 dollars fund raised to help fund Project Break Free, mentorship and self-development programs in the communities mentioned above.

  • Over 20+ youth, from different areas of the country, have participated in our annual Project Break Summit, held successfully in NYC since 2017.

  • Over 9 years of community service experience from our founder, Ms. Hillary Vargas. She has been working with urban, inner-city communities, first starting in Providence, RI, since 2009. Rose 2 Hope was officially founded in 2015.